Robert Halfon MP

Career

Conservative MP for Harlow (since 2010). Executive Member of 1922 Committee.


Issues

He said in a debate in 2010 [1] (which he initiated) among other valuable comments:

The time has come for the Government to set up a serious commission of inquiry composed of members who have expertise in civil liberties, the internet and commerce. The commission should suggest a new legal framework to redress the balance, giving citizens an affordable and speedy means of redress.
Perhaps the best means would be an internet bill of rights, which would give the citizen some notion of his rights. At first, such an internet bill of rights might be a semi-voluntary code, as currently proposed in Europe.

Primary sponsor of 2012 EDMs 2655 and 2654 concerned about privacy on O2 and Google. Mr Halfon didn't sign 2010 EDM 1036 calling for possible Government intervention to preserve net neutrality, but instead sponsored his own variation in favour of transparency alone, but which stated "the definition of net neutrality is confused at best and has a different definition to different peoples and governments... allowing [sic] for internet neutrality will stifle online innovation and lead to over-regulation of internet service providers who will not be technically able to provide internet access in an open manner".

In January 2015[1]:

I was previously on the civil libertarian side of these arguments, but given recent events—not just in France, but elsewhere—I have come to the conclusion that the Home Secretary is absolutely right.


Communications Bill

Halfon argues that any form of regulation on the Internet is another term for censorship, and that it is a “slippery slope.” [2]


Prior Career

Conservative Researcher.


Education

University of Exeter - BA in Politics and MA in Russian and Eastern European Politics.


Contact Information

Robert Halfon MP, House of Commons, London SW1A 0AA; halfon4harlow@roberthalfon.com; 01279 311451.


Links

Reference

  1. Hansard, 2015-01-14
  2. http://www.theyworkforyou.com/debates/?id=2011-04-05c.915.0&s=internet+censorship#g917.0